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Mixdown, Dynamics & EQ (and related) Topic

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Postby SoulofSound » 07 Jan 2016, 00:07

I have a question guys. When i make a sample lets say a kick or sound fx.
Should i normalize after bouncing it?
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Postby TJOAudio » 10 Jan 2016, 20:08

No, most plugins are calibrated at -12 ,so pushing a 0db into a plugin can cause internal clipping, this ofc is a massive generalisation but, better the be on the safe side, unless the saturated/distorted sound is what you're going for.
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Postby leeroy » 11 Jan 2016, 19:54

SoulofSound:I have a question guys. When i make a sample lets say a kick or sound fx.
Should i normalize after bouncing it?

I would say.. only if the sound is completely finished, if you still want to do a bit more with the sound, i'd say don't bother normalizing it - you might need the headroom
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Postby SoulofSound » 11 Jan 2016, 23:33

Ok cool. That helps me a lot. Thanks ;)
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Postby NRx Hardstyle » 30 Jan 2016, 11:48

Quick question, has anyone used M/S mastering to get more "Gain" in their track, or is it just something that doesnt work with hardstyle? Im curious, because of http://tcdnb.com/the-dark-arts-of-mid-side/. If anyone is using it is there any good guidelines or just by ear?
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Postby D-Verze » 30 Jan 2016, 15:27

One of the main things you try to achieve when mixing is making sure sounds are not in each other's way. This indeed helps with getting more volume out of your track and one of the tools you can use is panning and mid/side processing. However, always make sure that your track still sounds good in mono, as most people who will listen to your tracks will not be in the ideal position for stereo
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Postby GianaWana » 07 Mar 2016, 14:21

hey guys i heard in a live video of zatox something like "the mix in E is always difficult, a pain in the ass..so i change all the track in F. i made other tracks in E but it's almost impossible to have a good mix on E"
https://www.facebook.com/djzatox/videos ... 867591064/
this is the video, skip to 11 min.
someone can explain why?
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Postby Kedde » 07 Mar 2016, 18:18

Could be multiple things that make him think that:
1) His studio setup (speakers and/or the room acoustic) might not work in E. Something might even resonate at E.
2) The fear of the sound system at parties not being able to generate the sub well enough. I doubt this is the case though.
3) Maybe his ears are just more used to mixing in F. If he knows for sure something works in F then of course he'll prefer F above E. :)
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Postby Neko » 07 Mar 2016, 19:47

What kedde said and:

Or the kicks he makes get unplanned dynamics or frequency disturbance/interference.
I usually get it when going down low on D# or even D or up to D & D#. It gets fuzzy all the way. Depends on the algorithm which is used to pitch. There are so many and I din't found one without problem with my kick on D.
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Postby CAP » 18 Mar 2016, 15:55

SoulofSound:Ok cool. That helps me a lot. Thanks ;)

here's another reason to not normalize. lets say you mix your track first then want to bounce your kick and in your mix the kick is peaking at -12dB. It's probably going to be in the general area when you mix your next track or make your next mix. meaning that when you go to mix, you're not making as drastic faders movements. despite your daw being digital, you still get better fader resolution by unity as opposed to pushing the fader down low. down low, instead of making a 0.5dB movement, it's more like 1-3dB. And i know that sounds stupid picky but it honestly makes a difference in the end. and if you take anything away from this, it's that at the end of the day when you gain stage even when writing your track, that at the end of your signal path your channel fader is close to unity
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Postby Soundphase » 16 Jul 2016, 23:26

hope someone knows the answer to this
- with an unmastered track, at what db volume should the hardstyle kick be playing at for an acceptable loudness and for ultimately a good mix?

with a hardstyle or hardcore kick I'm unsure of the link between too quiet and too loud since the mids in the kick can be quite harsh if played too loud in headphones
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Postby ExMachina » 22 Jul 2016, 10:15

I would say mix at clipping point in all times. If the master engineer wants your track in -3dB's for example, he could simply lower the input gain, right?
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Postby Neko » 30 Aug 2016, 16:04

Soundphase:hope someone knows the answer to this
- with an unmastered track, at what db volume should the hardstyle kick be playing at for an acceptable loudness and for ultimately a good mix?

with a hardstyle or hardcore kick I'm unsure of the link between too quiet and too loud since the mids in the kick can be quite harsh if played too loud in headphones

Really depends on your kick's dynamics.
I for example usually mix with -10db on the kick going for a -6db mixdown. (While keeping the subbass on a -15db ceiling on its respective frequency)

And @ExMachina:
no, mix with enough space. Try to keep -3db or -6db as a ceiling for your mix and check out my tutorial on mixdowns (its old and not really up2date anymore but still should give you a basic idea on it)
http://harderstate.com/tutorials-f22/maneki-neko-s-step-by-step-guide-on-mixdowns-t27479.html
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Postby CAP » 01 Sep 2016, 15:05

ExMachina:I would say mix at clipping point in all times. If the master engineer wants your track in -3dB's for example, he could simply lower the input gain, right?

yes, he could lower the input gain. but the other side is he needs headroom to do his job and use EQ as well as compression to finalize your mix. the other aspect that's dangerous to your mix when you're trying to bounce at -3dB is your metering - peaks that are too fast for your meter to read will create distortion if the transients are high enough to clip the stereo bus

overall, it's good to back off to around -6db peak to save yourself clipping and to give the mastering engineer room
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Postby CAP » 01 Sep 2016, 15:13

Soundphase:hope someone knows the answer to this
- with an unmastered track, at what db volume should the hardstyle kick be playing at for an acceptable loudness and for ultimately a good mix?

with a hardstyle or hardcore kick I'm unsure of the link between too quiet and too loud since the mids in the kick can be quite harsh if played too loud in headphones


the mix is the audio version of the theory of relativity. how loud should the kick be? that doesn't really matter as long as it's loud enough to overcome the volume related bit depth reduction of your DAW and anything over -20dB should be more than fine. even then the whole bit depth reduction might be more related to older DAWs than to today. to digress back to the relativity stuff, the volume of the kick doesn't really matter....what matters is it's relative volume and tonality against your other instruments. typically though, mine seem to sit around -12dB and can bump up to -8dB some times

tldr: as long as you make a well balanced mix, it doesn't matter how loud the kick is
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